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Forrest Fenn’s MBTI

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  • Forrest Fenn’s MBTI

    So, I’ve been crunching on the poem for several years, but I’m new to the blogs, so this may have already been addressed— but, what do you think ff’s Myers Briggs personality type is? In my very humble opinion, he is either an INTJ (based on his cryptic writings) or an ENTP (puckishness required to hide the treasure and keep such a great secret for fun). Thoughts?

  • #2
    I don't know a lot about Myers Briggs assessments or the Jungian types. I don't distrust them exactly, but rather I see human traits on a gradient, and I'm not sure the results (ie the sum total of a person) is a zero-sum game. In particular it seems like really smart people can adopt techniques and behaviors outside their types. I've always thought that the best leaders, for example, are sociopaths who have learned empathy, which is a trait diagnostically not part of the sociopath's toolkit.

    With that said, if I had to pick one I'd say he's probably something like an ESTP. Brave yourself for a blast of pseudo-scientific blathering:

    Definitely Extrovert, though some Introverts can flawlessly mimic Extroverts for limited durations. Those kinds of people always need downtime to recharge. I don't gather Forrest is one who gets energy from doing 'nothing.'

    I think he's innately Sensing but has taught himself Intuition. He seems to be on the autistic spectrum which tends to be more literal and practical. But keen intelligence and observation has taught him how to think more abstractly, and he probably associates intuition with intelligence and has developed that preference.

    He doesn't seem 'warm' in the traditional sense to me, though I've never met him. I think the warmness he exhibits is an effect of his charm. So I think he's Thinking sometimes masquerading as Feeling.

    Finally, it's pretty clear he's Perceiving rather than Judging. Some mavericks are sticklers, like Kierkegaard, but mostly I think they hold little store in rules and lists and predictability.
    Last edited by antigroove; 01-12-2019, 02:54 AM.
    When you find yourself at the end of the rainbow, you'll have found what you seek.

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    • #3
      On the fence is an ‘X’ I think.
      XNTP
      Questing (?) song:
      https://soundcloud.com/adamjensenmusic/the-hunter-1

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      • #4
        INTJ

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        • #5
          Originally posted by antigroove View Post
          I don't know a lot about Myers Briggs assessments or the Jungian types. I don't distrust them exactly, but rather I see human traits on a gradient, and I'm not sure the results (ie the sum total of a person) is a zero-sum game. In particular it seems like really smart people can adopt techniques and behaviors outside their types. I've always thought that the best leaders, for example, are sociopaths who have learned empathy, which is a trait diagnostically not part of the sociopath's toolkit.

          With that said, if I had to pick one I'd say he's probably something like an ESTP. Brave yourself for a blast of pseudo-scientific blathering:

          Definitely Extrovert, though some Introverts can flawlessly mimic Extroverts for limited durations. Those kinds of people always need downtime to recharge. I don't gather Forrest is one who gets energy from doing 'nothing.'

          I think he's innately Sensing but has taught himself Intuition. He seems to be on the autistic spectrum which tends to be more literal and practical. But keen intelligence and observation has taught him how to think more abstractly, and he probably associates intuition with intelligence and has developed that preference.

          He doesn't seem 'warm' in the traditional sense to me, though I've never met him. I think the warmness he exhibits is an effect of his charm. So I think he's Thinking sometimes masquerading as Feeling.

          Finally, it's pretty clear he's Perceiving rather than Judging. Some mavericks are sticklers, like Kierkegaard, but mostly I think they hold little store in rules and lists and predictability.
          Well Said. I switched frenquencies about 1-1/2 years ago after learning some of the Archetypes including my own. I think it has made a tremendous difference. There is a particular frequency to the Poem which I anticipate Mr. Fenn to say "I didn't write the Poem with any Frequency". It doesn't matter if he sees the frequency or if you "feel" the frequency or "perceive" the frequency or how ever you tune your dial. I would n't be on this board today snooping around without a little Jungian Kool Aide.
          Last edited by John Smith; 01-12-2019, 07:07 AM.

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          • #6
            I've always been afraid to know how I classify because once I know what box I supposed to be in, I fear becoming claustrophobic that I am confined or otherwise limited by it. It's an influence I prefer to avoid having rattling around in my subconscious.

            Trying to accurately classify Forrest Fenn without actually knowing him, much less being able to interview him, seems rather likely to yield a very inaccurate result. Especially if you are evaluating him primarily by what he wrote in his memoirs and what he has said in interviews. Those books and interviews were well thought out and deliberately made to leave out a considerable amount of information to portray him in the way he wants to be portrayed rather than how he actually is.

            I believe he said something to the effect of, it's not who you are but who they think you are that matters.

            Good luck with that.

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            • #7
              Not an easy task to say the least. No other way to find the tresaure though.......unless you stumble upon it by sheer luck. IMO

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              • #8
                It could easily be found in short order if everyone collaborated and shared everything they have figured out.

                I believe everything has been solved in the poem, just not all by the same person or small team of searchers.

                We each have one or more pieces of this puzzle, but no one seems to have found them all yet.

                Granted, it would still be difficult to sift through all of the solves clues to find the right ones and get them in the correct order, but if everyone collaborated, I believe it could be done and be done relatively quickly.

                But Forrest sized the value of the chest perfectly where it would be enough to lure most people, but not enough to be worth splitting ten ways or investing in expensive technology that could find it.





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                • #9
                  10-4

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LurkerMike View Post
                    It could easily be found in short order if everyone collaborated and shared everything they have figured out.

                    I believe everything has been solved in the poem, just not all by the same person or small team of searchers.

                    We each have one or more pieces of this puzzle, but no one seems to have found them all yet.

                    Granted, it would still be difficult to sift through all of the solves clues to find the right ones and get them in the correct order, but if everyone collaborated, I believe it could be done and be done relatively quickly.

                    But Forrest sized the value of the chest perfectly where it would be enough to lure most people, but not enough to be worth splitting ten ways or investing in expensive technology that could find it.




                    You’re probably right, Mike, but what fun would there be in that?

                    One thing that’s so interesting to me is how wildly differently people interpret his poem. And I think that people’s interpretations say a lot about the interpreter — kind of like how people will interpret song lyrics in a way that has personal meaning to them. So, the MBTI thing, to me, is relevant in the sense that people who experience the world in a similar way to ff, are probably more likely to interpret his clues accurately. I’m certainly not claiming that I do. The more I read of his writings, the more I think the dude is pretty singular.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LurkerMike View Post
                      I've always been afraid to know how I classify because once I know what box I supposed to be in, I fear becoming claustrophobic that I am confined or otherwise limited by it. It's an influence I prefer to avoid having rattling around in my subconscious.

                      Trying to accurately classify Forrest Fenn without actually knowing him, much less being able to interview him, seems rather likely to yield a very inaccurate result. Especially if you are evaluating him primarily by what he wrote in his memoirs and what he has said in interviews. Those books and interviews were well thought out and deliberately made to leave out a considerable amount of information to portray him in the way he wants to be portrayed rather than how he actually is.

                      I believe he said something to the effect of, it's not who you are but who they think you are that matters.

                      Good luck with that.
                      Eh, you could take the test, get a type and then have a completely different type in an hour or a year or whatever. It’s somewhat dependent on outlook.
                      Questing (?) song:
                      https://soundcloud.com/adamjensenmusic/the-hunter-1

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Algidgemini View Post
                        So, the MBTI thing, to me, is relevant in the sense that people who experience the world in a similar way to ff, are probably more likely to interpret his clues accurately. I’m certainly not claiming that I do. The more I read of his writings, the more I think the dude is pretty singular.
                        I totally agree that if you could nail down an accurate assessment of Forrest Fenn it would have far more value than most any other method of cracking the poem and few would call it "cheating" because you are just trying to get a better understanding of him.

                        My point is that getting that assessment wrong would have the opposite effect of sending us even farther off course. Because the risk of getting it wrong is so high, I don't think I would want to risk trying to utilize this methodology.

                        A couple of traits Forrest Fenn excels at that should be obvious, an expert sense of timing and the patience to wait for the right time in order to exploit opportunities.

                        I learned about this concept as a child watching Johnny Carson do his monolog. Johnny's jokes weren't that funny. I know, I tried retelling them and they always fell flat. Why then were they so funny when he told them? Because he had a perfect sense of timing. He knew exactly how long to pause before delivering the punch line at just the right moment. Carson's humor was more in the mastery of his execution rather than in the joke itself.

                        If you want to make money in sales, you need to buy low and sell high. This too requires a sense of timing and certainly, the business of trading in art requires many multiple issues that must be timed. These include the trajectory of a particular artist's notoriety and popularity. It requires a sense of the state and trends of the economy in general and of the customer base in particular. When times are good and customers have more money to spend, you need to increase inventory to supply the increase in demand and raise prices accordingly. A lot of intuition plays into that as well. You don't want to get stuck in slow times with all of your liquidity tied up in a gallery that is already overstocked when that is the time to be buying at discount prices.

                        I think Forrest gave considerable timing to the Chase as well and that is a factor that would benefit us if we could figure out exactly why he did what he did when he did.

                        But I also think he overestimated our ability to solve the poem and I think that was mainly for reasons of projection where he assumed there were a lot of people operating at his mental level of problem-solving ability. I'm sorry to disappoint him as I am sure he has come to realize by now that has been demonstrated to not be the case with the searchers in the Chase.

                        I have known many people who suffered from superiority complexes who were far less qualified to have them than Forrest Fenn. Yet he presents himself as someone with a slight inferiority complex that has at least some unfulfilled need for validation. For a time I wrote that off as modesty and humility and perhaps a degree of self-depreciation needed to lower himself to our level to achieve that "I'm ok, you're ok" interpersonal dynamic. Perhaps a leftover sales tactic to make the customer think they are the one taking advantage of the salesperson.

                        But I have come to believe it is not a ploy or a tactic. That Forrest has lived most of his life surrounded by people recognized for their greatness and it would be hard not to feel overshadowed by them. He entered the Air Force at a time when most of those above him were veterans of WWII and he had to have known more than a few aces back then.

                        When Forrest flew the F-100 Super Saber "Hun" in Vietnam, it was not the super sexy top of the line aerial superiority fighter of the day, the F-4 Phantom had that role. The Hun's were used mostly for close air support and attack roles similar to how the P-47 Thunderbolt "Jug" was displaced to these same roles by the P-51 Mustang. It is a less glamorous but just as dangerous job, if not more dangerous.

                        I don't know how the Hun stacked up to Phantom in a mock dogfight, but I do know that I would by far rather have piloted a Jug over any other WWIi fighter, especially the far more vunerable and lighter armored and armed Mustang. Yet it was the Mustang that got the most glory and its single greatest attribute was its fuel economy and resulting long range.

                        The point here is that Jug pilots were just as deserving of recognition as Mustang pilots but were overshadowed by them. And don't get me started on Chuck Yeager.

                        So I think that it is possible this could be at least a contributing factor in why Forrest gave us the Chase.

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                        • #13
                          How did I know you were Sensei?

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                          • #14
                            When I was in juvie I got I-Leveled an I-IV CTM, Interpersonal level IV counter active manipulator. Later in life I was dragged into another long and arduous psychological inquiry resulting in a fresh, new tag: ENJT, -A/-T. It is a curious thing to be able to see yourself as others see you. Both diagnoses are similar, but I have to admit that when I took the MBTI assessment as an adult I was in a red jumpsuit, leg irons, hand cuffs chained to my waist and with a guard standing behind my back. In all honesty he did uncuff one hand for some of the test. I felt so liberated.

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