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  • #16
    Originally posted by Tur-a-neu View Post

    No, I do not like virtual discussion. I would much prefer a face to face. I even wanted a face to face over a year ago and could not get a response for one. Things got ugly back then. I kept thinking that a face to face would have avoided a lot of misunderstandings. I don't see any change for the future for me and feel stuck with a virtual discussion or none at all. I doubt that 'virtual' will repair what 'virtual' destroyed. For me, to see a person's face is like reading the heart. The eyes are of the soul. I would have been assured all would be ok just by seeing the real person. But this is the 2019s soon and all is virtual - look at me, I'm a butterfly . . .

    I've tried video games - my vision or how I see things became clearly insufficient to see the virtual going on. Hard to explain. But I didn't find fun in it anyway. I do live with a gammer.
    I agree that a lot more information can be gleaned from in-person interaction. There’s no ‘intonation variation’ found online. I’ve read things that I wrote (have written?) that are interpretive 5 different ways. I think F struggles (enjoys?) this same effect.

    ...very mysterious... (said like a wily wabbit)
    Questing (?) song:
    https://soundcloud.com/adamjensenmusic/the-hunter-1

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Rose Livingstone View Post

      I agree that a lot more information can be gleaned from in-person interaction. There’s no ‘intonation variation’ found online. I’ve read things that I wrote (have written?) that are interpretive 5 different ways. I think F struggles (enjoys?) this same effect.

      ...very mysterious... (said like a wily wabbit)
      IMO He like most enjoy the words and multi-interpretive meanings at least when it was for a harmless topic. But when it comes to business, IMO he would probably struggle with the interaction and find that the information was not understood in say the 5 different ways --- lacking in the one important way. But it is what it is and at least he has always been a business man and blogs are not for business transactions. Some times there is a business deal and there would be no wiggle room for multiple interpretations. "More like I see what you want" and "I would agree to xx as the price" -- does not fit virtually when one is not sure who is typing and who is reading the entertainment. I think the old people were the wiser -- like your wily wabbit but I think his Willy is probably more fun

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      • #18
        The first clue is the only thing keeping the tc hidden.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Buddy Allen View Post
          The first clue is the only thing keeping the tc hidden.
          I can agree with that... I'm personally looking at the contental divide again since it's part of the big picture. And it close to where polar bears come from... lol

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          • #20
            Clues are one thing and get one nowhere - it's what they mean that takes life and that life leads the way. Perhaps instead of 'follow the money' type thought, try 'follow the life' type thought. Something to think about in these cold winter days. Brrrrr!

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            • #21
              The clues have not been deciphered due to lack of imagination.
              Paintings of Thomas Moran were not always as seen. With his imagination he brought millions of tourists into western fantasy. A lot of his paintings were painted with imagination and not actual depiction of scenery.
              As I read about past explorers it seems most used imagination in thought of topography.
              Geology was key to discovery as was imagination key to geology.

              Is this the key Fenn speaks of.

              They also speak of architecture?

              So why did Forest read so much about Osborne Russell and then search for Lewis and Clark?

              The ole switch a roo to confuse searchers, but he didn’t fool the hunter!!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by 1Trailblazer View Post
                The clues have not been deciphered due to lack of imagination.

                So why did Forest read so much about Osborne Russell and then search for Lewis and Clark?

                The ole switch a roo to confuse searchers, but he didn’t fool the hunter!!
                One could assume Russell was an interesting read. Russell had a different end purpose, and learning from him could be applied elsewhere. Of course, reading material was limited and scarce and one read what was available. That is something that could easily be forgotten in this ebook-, video/vemo-, media-at-one's-fingertip, Internet society.

                The rest of the story would be: When it came to adventure, there had to be more 'thrill' in it than selecting a device, setting a trap, catching a critter, releasing it and going home. Russell seemed as non-adventurous as fishermen selecting fish heads, dropping crab traps into the bay, walking away, returning to pull up their catches and release them, and go home. Where's the thrill of it all? Forrest appeared as one who does not sit still, who seems to get into adventures alone and with a bro or buddy, tests every system, and he is a tease. He is a perfectionist as well and crafted things like marbles during school and tied those flies when he worked at the fly shop. One may never know his intent with that disappearing ball of string. Searching for Lewis and Clark is more like satisfying a cultured taste for adventure. There's what Forrest lives for - that Thrill of the Chase. While dozens of coastal anglers tossed their lines into the ocean and anchored their poles into the sandy shore and waited with a beer, Forrest fly fished and there was never time for a cold one until he was successful. He loved the sport of work first and then enjoy the evening. I think he would say that he never really worked a day. Forrest was hooked at a tender age. His skills were superior and his love to share with others helped defray the cost of that work which was really play. Lewis and Clark adventure held a treasure -- one might even call it gold. Just the thought of their adventure and find had Forrest turning over logs, stepping off the beaten path -- adventure seeking. A treasure he wanted so much and an adventure he loved to extend to others. The adventure is The Thrill of the Chase and the treasure is worth the cold.

                The ole switch a roo of most likely many switch a roos - but are you implying that he would actually, intentionally confuse searchers? woooow. Did he think he would fool the hunter?

                Yours, friend.

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                • #23
                  You may want to read up on Russell. He was the first explorer to accurately keep a journal of flora, fauna, Indian life and mapping. Most of the mountain men movies and westerns with Robert Redford are based on that book Forrest read at age 16. All other accounts of the mountain men were hear say. Stories told time and time losing actual truth. Kinda like the Bible.

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                  • #24
                    He said it wouldn’t be found for 100 years. I haven’t seen his story change. You only mislead yourself, he is just telling stories like an old Indian Chief. He is not giving hints in my opinion. Why would he. That man does not change his mind.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 1Trailblazer View Post
                      You may want to read up on Russell. He was the first explorer to accurately keep a journal of flora, fauna, Indian life and mapping. Most of the mountain men movies and westerns with Robert Redford are based on that book Forrest read at age 16. All other accounts of the mountain men were hear say. Stories told time and time losing actual truth. Kinda like the Bible.
                      I remembered the journal later on. Journalizing came and there were notable ones. Some were called diaries or logs. When teaching the Diary of Anne Frank, some students understood the value of journalizing and began the task. What makes a journal or log in exploration was to note everything and draw pictures noting particulars and mapping to recall where and how it was achieved. I don't recall any including selfies The task of keeping a journal was important because it logged what was seen each time and the changes over time.

                      After looking at Forrest's scrapbooks and books, it makes me wonder about his journaling skills - I imagine his mapping is superior and yet simple and his details are written vividly of things for every sense. Remember, he mentioned the smell of pine, the sight of yellow and purple flowers, butterflies, etc. What I think he may have struggled with - those drawings of earth's wonders. Stick figures for all!

                      I came across one woman who kept a journal and could not believe her sketches. Impressive. I would love to see Forrest's. I wonder if he would have included weeds . . . I so love weeds and different lighting on any water that had I taken the time to journal, they would have been included. I came across another woman who kept a journal and she could have been Forrest's twin in drawing -- Stick figures all the way!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 1Trailblazer View Post
                        He said it wouldn’t be found for 100 years. I haven’t seen his story change. You only mislead yourself, he is just telling stories like an old Indian Chief. He is not giving hints in my opinion. Why would he. That man does not change his mind.
                        I think he gives out reinforcing hints all the time. Have you ever hidden anything and watched people search helplessly? I can't do it for long and not give out allusions to where or how it's hidden, even though they probably do more harm to the person's effort than good (certainly not my intent, just how it works out).

                        While I think you basically have to mostly solve it to understand the hints he drops, they reinforce the solution and may just tickle your brain enough to help.

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                        • #27
                          I myself think I’m in the correct area, and everything he says can make sense usually anywhere in the Rockies.

                          There are a lot of thinkers, whether educated as a scientist, school teacher, architect, builders, notice I didn’t say politician.

                          With I think 189 SB’s, one of those thinking minds would have found it, even if he gave hints in only half of them.

                          He said he doesn’t give hints, and the TTOTC is all you need. That was his original plan and if you ask me he doesn’t give an inch, because he knows we will take a mile.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Buddy Allen View Post
                            The first clue is the only thing keeping the tc hidden.
                            Good one. Now, here's a question for yew. Do you keep your radiation belt in Allen's van?

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                            • #29
                              Allen’s not in the San Rafael swell is he?
                              Maybe in Mexico searching for uranium with mom.
                              Or some far off desert finding arrowheads. Lol

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                                Good one. Now, here's a question for yew. Do you keep your radiation belt in Allen's van?
                                Well I heard it on the solar wind that Orion's belt is better than 3 sisters and a string of pearls.

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