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  • #16
    Who's physics and why did he tell f the treasure is wet, how would he know

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JChere View Post
      Who's physics and why did he tell f the treasure is wet, how would he know
      "physics tells me the treasure is wet.f" was Forrest's response
      Favorite ff quote: ".... When these guys are making a mistake I don’t want to interrupt them." -ff
      Search Theme Song: Dead Horse
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-WseJTfILc

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      • #18
        Originally posted by goldwatch View Post

        Yeah, you're right. Because when your pipes freeze, they won't burst if you leave the faucet on to allow the expansion along the pipes, rather than outward.
        Dang, man, you're lucky you didn't shoot out someone's eye with that move.
        Preventing back pressure in the pipe is part of it, but allowing a trickle keeps the warmer water flowing, and this prevents it stagnating so it can cool.

        My pipe was a physics experiment. The longitudinal pressure in a pipe is half of the hoop stress, so pipes usually rupture along their axis. My calculations expected the threads on the nipples to fail first because the almost 3/8" wall on the steel pipe were stronger than the thread pull out strength. I was right. I never found the end that blew off. I can still see some neighbor scratching his head wondering how that thing got on his roof!

        If you think about something like a baby mammoth being well preserved after being frozen vs a beer can exploding in your freezer, there is a difference in the freezing scenarios. The mammoth and chest are surrounded by snow before being encased in ice. For this reason they are in a constant pressure environment. The potential energy for the beer can bursting comes from the differential pressure from within and without the can. This is why Shackelton's shop The Endurance sank in the Antarctic. Looking at it this way the chest may not be damaged at all from being sent to a near by ice age. At worst the bottle will shatter compromising the autobiography, and that would be a loss as I do want to read it. The chest may also get toasted, but the pieces would all still be there, and artifacts from antiquity can and often are restored to preserve their historic value.

        In any event, it is easy to see that the chest contents could well be wet.

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        • #19
          Wet Mountains, Southern Colorado, not far from Bathtub Pass.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Mrox View Post

            That’s some good analysis on underwater! Personally I don’t think he means from water when he says the chest is wet. Although it could be from condensation or dew or moisture in the soil. But all of those seem too simple an answer and FF seems the type who wants to make people think.
            If not water, then what other liquid(s) would be involved? Let's list a few: alcohol, gasoline, mercury . . . then there are some that contain water: blood, milk, wine (particularly Bordeaux), brandy (particularly Napoleon brandy), soup (particularly pea soup, as in London fog), etc.

            If I remember correctly, when FF said that he knows the chest is wet, it was during the month of February. Let's see . . . February in the Rocky Mountains . . . yep, wet. No biggie. Not a clue.
            And in my opinion, it's not even a hint. So it all should be ignored. Back to the poem, all stout-hearted folks.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JChere View Post
              Who's physics and why did he tell f the treasure is wet, how would he know
              Sol R Physics, and he knows this guy, see.
              AKA: Buckeye Bob

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              • #22
                Originally posted by WanderingLost View Post

                Preventing back pressure in the pipe is part of it, but allowing a trickle keeps the warmer water flowing, and this prevents it stagnating so it can cool.

                My pipe was a physics experiment. The longitudinal pressure in a pipe is half of the hoop stress, so pipes usually rupture along their axis. My calculations expected the threads on the nipples to fail first because the almost 3/8" wall on the steel pipe were stronger than the thread pull out strength. I was right. I never found the end that blew off. I can still see some neighbor scratching his head wondering how that thing got on his roof!

                If you think about something like a baby mammoth being well preserved after being frozen vs a beer can exploding in your freezer, there is a difference in the freezing scenarios. The mammoth and chest are surrounded by snow before being encased in ice. For this reason they are in a constant pressure environment. The potential energy for the beer can bursting comes from the differential pressure from within and without the can. This is why Shackelton's shop The Endurance sank in the Antarctic. Looking at it this way the chest may not be damaged at all from being sent to a near by ice age. At worst the bottle will shatter compromising the autobiography, and that would be a loss as I do want to read it. The chest may also get toasted, but the pieces would all still be there, and artifacts from antiquity can and often are restored to preserve their historic value.

                In any event, it is easy to see that the chest contents could well be wet.
                Would hoop stress not depend on the pipe's diameter, as well as the wall thickness? Please respond . . . thanks.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                  Would hoop stress not depend on the pipe's diameter, as well as the wall thickness? Please respond . . . thanks.
                  Hoop stress = pressure x pipe raduis/ wall thickness. Longitudinal stress = pressure x pipe radius /(2 x wall thickness) and is therefore half of the hoop stress. All other parameters being held constant hoop stress is inversely proportional to wall thickness. Failure by thread pullout is shear stress of the first three threads of full engagement at the pitch line diameter of the threads. For a 4" SCH 80 steel pipe should, and did experimentally, fail at the threads. Hoop and longitudinal pipe stresses are examples of thin wall pressure vessel stresses and therefore the equations are conservatively approximated and used as suitable for most applications. For a more precise formula along with their derivations refer to Roark ("guide to pain" as we call it) as I don't have my copy with me at the store I'm sorry to say.
                  Last edited by WanderingLost; 11-10-2018, 05:15 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Mrox View Post
                    Personally I don’t think he means from water when he says the chest is wet.
                    Maybe it's hidden where the brown bears go to pee.

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                    • #25
                      I've said this before, and it may seem far fetched, but who knows. Before the four cardinal directions were established as being North, South, East, West, people used words such as cold or wet to give directions. Wet could mean the direction which is the way you would go if you walk towards the ocean or river.
                      "It's awfully considerate of you to think of me here,
                      And I'm most obliged to you for making it clear that
                      I'm not here" -Syd Barrett

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                      • #26
                        Physics - get things rolling, elixir
                        Wet - precipitate, cause, get things rolling

                        There, you have physics (elixir) and wet (precipitate), both get things rolling, cause, lead to, generate, kindle, bring to pass, dream up

                        Imagination is more important than knowledge.

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